I have closely followed The Necromancers' journey through the realms of doom metal ever since their absurdly-strong debut record Servants of the Salem Girl. A chance discovery on the ever-consistent channel 666MrDoom, the album merged NWOBHM-style heavy metal and doom metal in a way that blew the absolute hell out of all the 'occult rock' doom that was clogging up the (digital) airwaves. It felt different, it rocked, and those two factors were enough to keep it in constant listening rotation ever since.

The French doomsters returned surprisingly quick with 2018's Of Blood and Wine, another powerful helping, and then fell silent for four years. Now, sporting a new vocalist, they're poised to unveil their third album Where the Void Rose next month. Though a lot has changed since their debut, two things are still true: The Necromancers continue to be different, and they still rock. Check out the video for new single "Orchard" below.

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Speaking of different: new vocalist Basile Chevalier-Coudrain's expressive range and intense charisma put a renewed focus on vocals within the band's riff-heavy, atmosphere-laden sound. Additionally, while I would normally not encourage higher production values for bands that are aiming for a retro sound, it pays off here. Where the Void Rose still captures a vintage doom aesthetic, but the fuzzy riffs are refined into a focused roar. The band takes a distinctly more progressive tack, also, still delivering magical, neoclassical leads and anthemic riffs, but blending them into more expansive song structures that let the band's instrumental chops shine.

With only four years distancing it from the last release, Where the Void Rose is a startlingly different and potent offering, putting yet another new spin on the merger of doom and heavy metal. New fans of The Necromancers will immediately love the dark, fantastical atmosphere and songcrafting, and for the relatively longer-term devotees, well, it's time to rise from the dead.

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Where the Void Rose releases September 16th, self-released but distributed via Ripple Music.

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