Despite ever-rising pressing plant costs and ever-dropping interest in short releases from both fans and journalists, the 7” single remains a hallowed staple of heavy metal. Long promised but also long delayed, Sölicitör (Seattle-based masters of both speed metal and of the dreaded double umlaut) have finally returned this year with their own take on the venerable format with All Debts on Death, a two-song rager of long format blitzes that each show valuable growth over the band’s 2020 debut Spectral Devastation as well as showcase exactly how powerful the twin guitar assault of the band is, with both guitarists writing one track.

All of the hallmarks of the band remain: blazing fast rhythms, startling and strange lead melodies, gorgeous dual guitar interplay, and the insanely tight scorching vocals provided by frontwoman and lyricist Amy Lee Carlson. Unafraid to ignore normal heavy metal tendencies, there are plenty of variations both here and on the band’s early material on heavy metal norms. Songs don’t necessarily structure around big verse/chorus arrangements, as you’d expect from what are both ambitiously some of the longest songs in Sölicitör’s catalog, and while there’s plenty of “standard” riffs the band also doesn’t shy from harmonies more aggressive than most heavy metal would trust, devastating tremolo picked lines, or flurries of speed even beyond the norm of a genre itself titled speed metal.

It also serves as a presumably-unintentional split between both of the band’s guitarists with each handling a single song’s writing, a proof of concept of their skill and coherency as a unit in addition to one showing their strength as individuals. The effect is conclusive: Sölicitör fucking rule, and combined now with a new producer are even stronger than on the fantastic earlier material.

Check out the 7” and grab a copy, and read below for a brief interview with guitarist Matt Vogan.

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All Debts on Death has been delayed for quite a while now. When was it actually recorded? Did you expect it to take until now for it to come out?

We originally recorded it in April of 2021. At the time, we were expecting a fall release at the latest. Gates of Hell came back and told us that due to delays at the pressing plant they wouldn’t have copies to sell until Jan/Feb. We all then decided to wait until Keep It True 2022, to do a special release at the festival. KIT was again delayed this year, so we went with the Feb release. A year after the initial recording wasn’t really what we were expecting, but then again, neither was a 2 year and counting global pandemic. Given the existential hand we’ve all been dealt, we are incredibly grateful to Bri and Enrico at Gates of Hell for their tenacious support and contribution.

You did the majority of the songwriting on the album per the credits, but this 7” appears to be split between one of your songs and one of Patrick’s. How does Solicitor handle making each song sound consistently like the same band given how much of an instantly identifiable sound the band has?

We try to adjust for continuity where needed but for the most part, Pat and my writing styles seem to play well together. Also, the input, contribution, and collaboration of everyone is what unifies it into been a Sölicitör song. It has to pass through a number of filters before it reaches its final incarnation. As far as my name dominating the writing credits on the first album, that had more to do with practicality and necessity. Everything moved very quickly when we started the band. We formed, recorded a demo, an EP, and an album all within our first year as a band. Not to mention just getting to know each other and our individual playing styles. I happened to have more ideas in the works at the time and we didn’t have the luxury of being picky. Even still, Pat contributed 3 fantastic songs to those releases. Now that we have a bit more room to explore our sound we are turning towards a more collaborative approach.

This 7” marks the band’s first recording with Seattle-based engineer Detto. What made you make the shift, and what does Detto bring to the table? Will Solicitor keep working with Detto moving forward?

I had known of Detto through his work with a number of Seattle Grind and Death Metal bands, including Cerebral Rot and Caustic Wound, and had spoken with some people who had worked with him and everyone really enjoyed their experiences. I pitched the idea of recording with him to the band, as we had been discussing trying some different engineers out before the next album and they were on board. We were hoping he would be able to bring an overall grittier, heavier production to our sound. I certainly feel he accomplished this while making everything sound roomier and much more vast. He runs everything through tape so it gets that warmth as well as that cold, cavernous spaciousness he is able to bring out. Plus, he’s just an overall great guy and a pleasure to work with! We are absolutely considering working with him in the future. I had known of Detto through his work with a number of Seattle Grind and Death Metal bands, including Cerebral Rot and Caustic Wound, and had spoken with some people who had worked with him and everyone really enjoyed their experiences. I pitched the idea of recording with him to the band, as we had been discussing trying some different engineers out before the next album and they were on board. We were hoping he would be able to bring an overall grittier, heavier production to our sound. I certainly feel he accomplished this while making everything sound roomier and much more vast. He runs everything through tape so it gets that warmth as well as that cold, cavernous spaciousness he is able to bring out. Plus, he’s just an overall great guy and a pleasure to work with! We are absolutely considering working with him in the future.

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All Debts on Death released January 26th via Gates of Hell Records.

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