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Schrödinger's cat isn’t the only thing that’s Dead and Alive. Parasite Inc.'s sophomore release's title was most likely not inspired by quantum superposition theory; however, it does neatly encapsulate how the band takes the classic melodic death metal formula, breathing new life into it with an abundance of synthesizers and electronic percussion.

The concept isn’t entirely new. The so-called “trance metal” of Japan’s Blood Stain Child pioneered such juxtaposition and the torch was admirably carried by the Swiss act Sybreed until their 2013 breakup. The important difference between Parasite, Inc. and most of their progenitors is in the melody -- more accurately, how they achieve tuneful resonance. Instead of relying on modern machinery to make things memorable, they have catchy riffs and hooks that would stand on their own even if someone forgot to plug in the keyboards.

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“This World,” streaming exlsuively above, is especially indicative of this. Although the extra-instrumentation adds ferocious power to Benjamin Stelzer’s drums and an eerie otherworldly gothic atmosphere overall, the guitars of Dominik Sorg and Kai Bigler create the accessibility. This is why they get compared to the style luminaries, groups which use electronics sparingly, if at all, yet churn out canorous choruses all the same.

Each song on Dead and Alive captures an intensity belying the industrial allusions, including the mechanized thrash of “Once and for All” and the rhythmic bluster of “Red Wine Collider.” Even a track that didn’t originally have guitars on it -- “Empty Streets,” a cover from cyberpunk synthwave project Scandroid that closes the album -- is anthemic, fist-punching fun.

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Dead and Alive will be released on August 17 via Reaper Entertainment. Follow Parasite Inc. on Facebook. Pre-orders are open from Bandcamp.

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