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Black metal's more recently found sense of rich self-indulgence is no secret - albums often include what appear to be boundless layers of sound, creating ambiance brick-by brick. Architecture is key, and the systematic filling of spaces keeps the structure aloft. It's simple logic, leave no stone unturned, and yet the simplest, most ancient buildings, made by the most meager, rustic means remain standing. German alchemical black metal project Mosaic operates under this archaic notion - use only what is necessary, and make the most of what you can with what is there. When I first listened to the new Samhain Celebration diptych, composed of the "Blood Is King" trilogy and "Bittersweet Odour," the sumptuous, enthralling atmosphere speaks the language of the aforementioned brick-walls - the lush, rich atmospheres constructed by main member and songwriter Inkantator Koura border on the oppressive, but belie a powerful simplicity. The Inkantator's songwriting "plays to the room" rather than the studio, powerful, cold chord progressions slowly unfurling and flowing, towering higher and higher until a simple melody line emerges from the miasma. It sounds like more is happening than what is really there, as if Inkantator Koura was creating illusory shapes in the haze, but that is all in the magic of beautiful, effective songwriting. Mosaic concentrates on alchemical symbologies Inkantator Koura builds around world myths, and alchemy speaks of essences - the simplest, purest, most powerful form of a being or concept's existence. Mosaic approaches atmospheric black metal's essence and harbors a presence larger than itself, bombastic, haunting, and ancient.

Mosaic will digitally release the Samhain Celebration sometime over the next few days, but we are humbled to offer an advance listen to these two songs here. The songs were originally released by Heimat Musik as part of a split with Grift, Farsot, and Vivus Humare. Scroll below for a first listen and a brief interview conducted with Inkantator Koura, meditating on the ideas covered in these two songs and the context of Mosaic as a whole.

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In previous releases, Mosaic has concentrated on historic myths, rituals, and symbols (the Kelpie/Waterhorse from the British Isles, Boreas the North Wind from Greece, and various seasonal celebrations), but the "Blood is King" cycle concentrates on more recent fiction. I don't recall ever hearing a black metal band referencing Stephen King - how does "Children of the Corn" fit into the greater scope of Mosaic?

'Blood Is King' refers to a lot of myths, rituals and symbols; as is the usual case with any Mosaic song. The central theme here is the Blood God Cenn Cruach, and the portal to the Netherworld. First describing the scenery; the harvested fields, the fog dwelling above them.. then followed by evocation and ultimately the appearance of the King, along with his portentous sermon about the demise of the modern world. Stephen King's story fit the mosaic just perfectly. An archaic harvesting cult, initiated by the most innocent beings imaginable – children – conducted by Him who walks behind the rows.. what a dark, sinister image this is. Have you ever listened to a children's choir? There is nothing more demonic than the pure essence of innocence. I was still searching for an expressive lead guitar for this song; and coincidence had it, the main theme of the original 'Children Of The Corn' O.S.T. happened to fit just perfectly. It marks that certain little something that makes this song something really special. The old horror movie's charme is woven into the whole fabric of this audible voyage – suited like no other for these times of Samhain, Halloween, All Hallows. And it was exactly that time of year this song has been written for.

Is it meant to parallel Stephen King's initial desire to highlight the aforementioned innate evil of innocence? Or is it part of the greater Blood Ritual context?

It's a bit of both really. I love playing with juxtapositions and opposites, because the world simply exists through them – wittingly and unwittingly. But it is also a blood ritual, loosely conceived and not pertaining in any way to established occult dogmata; a ritual arisen from the depths of my mind. After its conjuration, the Blood King rises to cast a vengeful sermon against the modern world and the demise of customs and traditions..

If the ritual is from your mind, are these various myths and symbologies touched upon and reshaped in the Mosaic discography allegorical as part of a greater concept? Moreover, is Mosaic global in that aspect or something more solipsistic and individual?

Yes, that's right. These are old stories, mythologies, tales, etc., but reinterpreted by me – or better, re-rendered - the way I see, perceive and understand them. The bigger picture encompassing everything in this case is the mosaic. It consists of a multitude of little stones, allegories – this is my Opus Magnum. Throughout the ages Philosophers have pondered about things and put their thoughts down in writing. I do the same. I create my own world view from most diverse sources. This is the only truth. In this world, I can create, reason, constitute and construe anything. This is essentially also one of the main reasons why my project is called what it is. Besides the many different musical influences, also lyrically and conceptually everything is being put together like a mosaic; constructed from many little stones and pieces until it becomes a coherent, conclusive entity to me. This is my life and my philosophy.

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